Green Tea …. It’s good for you. And just don’t take our word for it.

Posted by Lisa Kling on


Green Tea …. It’s good for you.  And just don’t take our word for it.    Consider this article from University of Maryland Medical Center.  https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/green-tea;  a summary extract is below.


Tea has been cultivated for centuries, beginning in India and China. It is the most widely-consumed beverage in the world, second only to water. Hundreds of millions of people drink tea, and studies suggest that green tea (Camellia sinesis sinesis) in particular has many health benefits.

Green tea is made from unfermented leaves and reportedly contains the highest concentration of powerful antioxidants called polyphenols. Antioxidants are substances that fight free radicals -- damaging compounds in the body that change cells, damage DNA, and even cause cell death. Many scientists believe that free radicals contribute to the aging process, as well as the development of a number of health problems, including cancer and heart disease. Antioxidants, such as polyphenols in green tea, can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause.

In traditional Chinese and Indian medicine, practitioners used green tea as a stimulant, a diuretic (to help rid the body of excess fluid), an astringent (to control bleeding and help heal wounds), and to improve heart health. Other traditional uses of green tea include treating gas, regulating body temperature and blood sugar, promoting digestion, and improving mental processes.

Green tea has been extensively studied in people, animals, and laboratory experiments. Results from these studies suggest that green tea may help treat the following health conditions: 

  • Atherosclerosis Population-based studies indicate that the antioxidant properties of green tea may help prevent atherosclerosis, particularly coronary artery disease. Population-based studies are studies that follow large groups of people over time or studies that compare groups of people living in different cultures or with different diets. Researchers believe green tea reduces the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Studies show that black tea has similar effects. In fact, researchers estimate that the rate of heart attack decreases by 11% with consumption of 3 cups of tea per day. However, in May 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rejected a petition from tea makers to allow tea labels to claim that green tea reduces the risk of heart disease. The FDA concluded that there is no credible evidence to support that claim.
  • High cholesterol: Research shows that green tea lowers total cholesterol and raises HDL ("good") cholesterol in both animals and people. One population-based clinical study found that men who drink green tea are more likely to have lower total cholesterol than those who do not drink green tea. Results from one animal study suggest that polyphenols in green tea may block cholesterol from being absorbed in the intestine and also help the body get rid of cholesterol
  • Cancer: Several population-based studies suggest that both green and black teas help protect against cancer. For example, cancer rates tend to be low in countries such as Japan where people regularly consume green tea. However, it is not possible to know for sure from these studies whether green tea actually prevents cancer in people.Early clinical studies suggest that the polyphenols in tea, especially green tea, may play an important role in the prevention of cancer in which the polyphenols help kill cancerous cells and stop them from growing.  People with cancer should consult with their doctor before adding tea to their regimen.
    • Bladder cancer.  Few studies have examined the relationship between bladder cancer and drinking tea. One study compared people with and without bladder cancer, researchers found that women who drank black tea and powdered green tea were less likely to develop bladder cancer. A follow-up clinical study by the same group of researchers revealed that people with bladder cancer (particularly men) who drank green tea had a better 5-year survival rate than those who did not drink green tea. 
    • Breast cancer. Studies in animals and test tubes suggest that polyphenols in green tea inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells. However, women with late stages of breast cancer had little or no improvement from drinking green tea.There is no clear evidence about green tea and breast cancer prevention
    • Colorectal cancer. Studies on the effects of green tea on colon or rectal cancer have showed conflicting results. Some studies show decreased risk in those who drink the tea, while others show increased risk. More research is needed before researchers can recommend green tea for the prevention of colorectal cancer.
    • Esophageal cancer. Laboratory animal Studies have found that green tea polyphenols inhibit the growth of esophageal cancer cells. However, studies in people have produced conflicting findings. Given these conflicting results, more research is needed before scientists can recommend green tea for the prevention of esophageal cancer.
    • Lung cancer. While green tea polyphenols have been shown to inhibit the growth of human lung cancer cells in test tubes, few clinical studies have looked at the link between drinking green tea and lung cancer in people. These studies that have been done have found conflicting results. Green tea should not be used by patients on bortezomib therapy.
    • Pancreatic cancer. In one large-scale clinical study researchers compared green tea drinkers with nondrinkers and found that those who drank the most tea were less likely to develop pancreatic cancer. This was particularly true for women -- those who drank the most green tea were half as likely to develop pancreatic cancer as those who drank less tea. Men who drank the most tea were 37% less likely to develop pancreatic cancer.  However, it is not clear from this population-based study whether green tea is solely responsible for lowering pancreatic cancer risk. 
    • Prostate cancer. Laboratory studies have found that green tea extracts prevent the growth of prostate cancer cells in test tubes. In a large clinical study in Southeast China researchers found that the risk of prostate cancer went down with increasing frequency, duration, and quantity of green tea consumption.
    • Skin cancer. The main polyphenol in green tea is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Scientific studies suggest that EGCG and green tea polyphenols have anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties that may help prevent the development and growth of skin tumors.
    • Stomach cancer. Laboratory studies have found that green tea polyphenols inhibit the growth of stomach cancer cells in test tubes. But studies in people have been less conclusive. More studies are underway to see whether green tea helps reduce the risk of stomach cancer.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD):  Green tea may help reduce inflammation associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two types of IBD. Diabetes: Green tea has been used traditionally to control blood sugar levels. Green tea may help regulate glucose in the body
  • Liver disease: Population-based studies have shown that men who drink more than 10 cups of green tea per day are less likely to develop liver problems. Green tea also seems to protect the liver from the damaging effects of toxic substances such as alcohol.
  • Weight loss: Clinical studies suggest that green tea extract may boost metabolism and help burn fat.
  • Other uses:  Preliminary studies suggest that drinking green tea can help prevent dental cavities. More studies need to be done. Green tea may also be useful in inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis.

Of course, you should always consult your doctor in advance about the best way to incorporate green tea into your treatment or regiments..

Bluffton Tea offer several varieties of Green Tea..see our collection